The French Art Of “Trelliage”: Elegant Latticework Of Architectural Distinction

Classical Distinction Of French Origin:  "Trelliage"
Classical Distinction Of French Origin: “Trelliage”

In appreciation of the elegance of the formal and classic embellishment of “Trelliage” Captivating and timeless. The enduring French art of “Trelliage” provides a distinctive and artistic use of latticework, for certain. From the Old French word “Treille” and the Latin word “Trichila” (for bower or arbor), the term “Trelliage” refers to the “Trellis of a highly developed form both artistically and architecturally”. Fretwork, latticework and lattice are all words that refer to a framework consisting of an ornamental design made of strips of wood or metal. Used in design throughout history with enduring appeal, the art of “Trelliage” delightfully thrives today within the exterior and interior worlds…

Of course, an appreciation of the origin of this grand element of form and function is necessary. The origins of “Trelliage” are linked to 12th century French country gardeners who created rudimentary structures, called “Treille”, to support the climbing tendrils of vines within their countryside gardens. Of note, these simple forms are said to have been typically constructed without order or regularity. Perhaps it is of no surprise that during the 17th century, under the reign and direction of King Louis XIV, that the basic form of “Trelliage” would “rise to unseen heights” of artistry. Alas, the construction of the elaborate, formal French gardens at Versailles. Landscape Architect, André Le Nôtre, was hired by Louis XIV to design and create an impressive and substantial French garden. The stunning “Salon De Trelliage” was an elaborate part of the grand gardens of Versailles. Paired with with carpentry of strong, painted wood, the formal and elegant design of “Trelliage” stood before the world. Impressive, elaborate and stunning, indeed…

King Louis XIV  & Landscape Architect  Andre Le Norte
King Louis XIV (1638-1715) & Landscape Architect Andre Le Norte (1613-1700)
Louis XIV & Landscape Architect  Andre Le Norte:  The Elaborate Formal French Gardens Of Versailles
The Elaborate Formal French Gardens Of Versailles/”Salon De Trelliage”

Throughout the 17th century, “Trelliage” became a highly disciplined art form. Le Nortre and other landscape architects relied on “forced perspective” and “absolute precision” to deliver a sense of grandeur to the garden setting. Scale was key to achieve these grand affects. Grand it was. “Trelliage” brought “instant” form and replaced the patience required in waiting for hedges and topiaries to grow to full maturity. Adding instant architecture to the garden scene, the impressive scale and elegant formality that “Trelliage” provided has endured to appeal. In fact, the desire to emulate the French architectural style would inspire royal palaces throughout Europe. This immediate sense of grandeur would move beyond the garden to grace the city facades of elegant colonnades, civic buildings and line interior passages with its formal scale. Architectural masterpieces, indeed…

Historic Renderings Of Classic French Style:  "Trelliage"
Historic Renderings Of Classic French Style: “Trelliage”
Vintage Renderings:  "Trelliage"
Vintage Renderings: “Trelliage”
Decorator
“Decorator” Elsie de Wolfe & New York City’s “Colony Club, Trellis Room”

At the turn of the century in America, the art of “Trelliage” was introduced as an element of distinction within the interior by famed decorator, Elsie de Wolfe, known for her appreciation of harmony, proportion and simplicity. In 1905 architect Stanford White commissioned Wolfe to design what is known as the “Trellis Room” at New York City’s private club for high society women, the “Colony Club”. Wolfe lined the walls and ceilings with trellises creating an airy and light effect that was fresh, daring and unexpected. Of interest, the sensation it created was not initially well received. Perhaps, as with any introduction of something new, the appreciation of an art form grows in time. Of interest, during the 1930’s “Trelliage” would continue to grace the world of interior design and was often paired with Chinoiserie inspired rooms. In fact, lattice, Chinoiserie and bamboo would all become design elements that would appear within the Hollywood Regency style interiors and would swell again with renewed appreciation during the 1960’s and 1970’s. Timeless and enduring, the lattice framework added to rooms of “admirable proportion” have continued to adorn the interior walls, ceilings and exterior garden structures and building facades with elegant architectural distinction

Architecture & Scale:  The Exterior World Of "Trelliage"
Architecture & Scale: The Exterior World Of “Trelliage”

Grandeur Of Classic  Garden Design:  "Treliage"
Grandeur Of Classic Garden Design: “Treliage”

Perspective Paired With Precision:  The Art Of "Trellialge"
Perspective Paired With Precision: The Art Of “Trellialge”

"Trelliage":  Classic Appeal
“Trelliage”: Classic Appeal
Ornamental Design Of Classic Appeal:  "Trelliage"
Ornamental Design Of Classic Appeal: “Trelliage”
Architectural Delight:  The Classic Framework Of "Trelliage"
Architectural Delight: The Classic Framework Of “Trelliage”
Grand Effects:  "Trelliage" & Interior Design
Grand Effects: “Trelliage” & Interior Design
Distinctive & Classic Design:  "Trelliage"
Distinctive & Classic Design: “Trelliage”
Classic Form Of Ornamentation Within The Interior:  "Trelliage"
Classic Form Of Ornamentation Within The Interior: “Trelliage”
Adorning The Interior With Classic Architectural Appeal:  "Trelliage"
Adorning The Interior With Classic Architectural Appeal: “Trelliage”
Decoration & Screening:  The Elegant Art Of "Trelliage"
Decoration & Screening: The Elegant Art Of “Trelliage”

Consider the elegance of “Trelliage”. Proportion and decoration of refined, classical ornamental additions to our exterior or interior worlds. Embraced by modern designers and architects with modern materials and methods, the legacy of the art form of “Trelliage” will certainly continue to endure. Outdoors it transforms ordinary walls or creates a private division to our exterior living spaces. Elegant partitions of privacy, indeed. And of the interior world embellished with “Trelliage”? The use of lattice work within interior rooms creates a light and airy, distinctive architectural feature that remains timeless. Walls of airy style, for certain. Whether built of lath, canvas or a trellis motif in painted appeal, consider with appreciation the embellishment of “Trelliage” to not only the structures within the garden, but adorning the facades of buildings and gracing elegant interiors. Beyond the framework of supporting climbing vines or plants, the art of form and function of “Trelliage” beyond this scope deserves our attention and appreciation. The classical French art of the latticework of “Trelliage” provides enduring architectural distinction, indeed…

Kristin

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “The French Art Of “Trelliage”: Elegant Latticework Of Architectural Distinction

    1. Yes, Trevor! I believe this is a style we all should revisit and rediscover throughout the interior and exterior world! A classic embellishment that will endure in appeal! May the UK dwell among the layers of the distinctive patterns of “Trelliage”! Thanks for sharing and for the “Reblog”!
      Kristin

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s