An Symbol Of Hospitality: The “Welcome” Appeal Of The Pinneapple

Nature's Tropical "Bounty" Within The Interior: The Pineapple
Nature’s Tropical “Bounty” Within The Interior: The Pineapple

Known as the “Princess of fruits and the symbol of hospitality”, the pineapple has endured to be used as a motif within architecture, statuary, interior decoration and of course, as a delight of sweetness within the culinary world

The Symbol Of Hospitality:  Nature's Pineapple
The Symbol Of Hospitality: Nature’s Pineapple

The Pineapple (botanically known as Ananas Comosus) is the leading edible member of the family Bromeliaceae. Pineapples are thought to have originated centuries ago in South America (specifically in Brazil and Paraguay). Tropical delights, indeed. Of interest, the pineapple has acquired a variety of terms of reference. It is called “Piña” in Spain, “abacaxi” in Portuguese, “ananas” by the Dutch and French, “nanas” in southern Asia and the East Indes, “po-lo-mah” in China, “sweet pine” in Jamaica and in Guatemala it is referred to as “pine”. On the Caribbean Island now known as Guadeloupe, it is believed that “A fateful interaction with Christopher Columbus” on his 2nd voyage in 1493 to the New World would begin the journey of this exotic and sweet fruit to the European shores. Columbus’s enchantment with this prickly exterior of distinction which held an exotic delight is perhaps the very link to the historic arrival of the pineapple to Spain and beyond. This “Piña” that bore a resemblance to a pinecone was an “Exotic Fruit” that would find continuing enchantment that would spread throughout Europe and eventually, American shores. Although the challenges of learning to grow this prized fruit that thrived in tropical climates would arise, by the mid-1600’s pineapples were being produced in “Hot-Houses” in Holland and England. Of interest, the first recorded “Hot-House” is recorded in 1642 in England’s Dutchess of Cleveland’s residence. Determination, perhaps, to gain the benefit of this coveted fruit would lead the motif of the pineapple to grow into the “symbol of hospitality and luxury” paired with its original historical rarity. For certain, the pineapple was an honored and coveted gift presented by royalty to the distinguished society. Royal privilege and a symbol of status and wealth, indeed.

King Charles II of England Receiving A Gift Of A Pineapple
King Charles II of England Receiving A Gift Of A Pineapple

Since Colonial times in America, the pineapple is considered to have been “put on a pedestal” as a symbol of welcome. The sweet taste of the pineapple brought forth a thriving trade which developed in the late 1600’s and early 1700’s, strengthening the pineapple as a status symbol. The fruit would not only grace the tables as a prized and sought after element of status and culinary delight but as a symbol of welcome. History states that American sea captains, upon returning from a voyage, would place this prized fruit on display outside their homes as a signal of their homecoming. Who knew? Perhaps this marked the very beginning of the pineapple as an element of greeting adorning exterior spaces as architectural embellishments found in pediments and architectural design. Alas, the pineapple as an iconic emblem is nothing new to the 20th Century and beyond. History has carried this sweet fruit with prickled and tough rosette of waxy and long pointed straplike leaves with an enduring appeal. The fruit awaiting within the needle tipped and sharp spines of the pineapple is a sweet gift of nature and an enduring icon that continues to offer a “warm welcome” to those that are greeted with its distinctive form. A gift, indeed…

"Gates of Izard Edwards-Smythe House" Charleston, South Carolina (1600's/Colonial America
“Gates of Izard Edwards-Smythe House” Charleston, South Carolina (1600’s/Colonial America
Nature's Sweet Delight:  The Pineapple
Nature’s Sweet Delight: The Pineapple
Architectural Distinction:  Pediments Adorned With The Pineapple
Architectural Distinction: Pediments Adorned With The Pineapple
The Emblem Of The Pineapple:  Exterior Distinction
The Emblem Of The Pineapple: Exterior Distinction
Exterior Inspirations:  The Iconic Welcome Of The Pineapple
Exterior Inspirations: The Iconic Welcome Of The Pineapple
Events & Entertaining With The Glorious Pineapple
Events & Entertaining With The Glorious Pineapple
Memorable Events Embellished  With The Pineapple
Memorable Events Embellished With The Pineapple

Celebrations Of Seasonal Bliss Paired With The Iconic Pineapple
Celebrations Of Seasonal Bliss Paired With The Iconic Pineapple

Interior Influences:  The Tropical "Pineapple"
Interior Influences: The Tropical “Pineapple”

Interior Inspirations:  The Welcoming Appeal Of The Pineapple
Interior Inspirations: The Welcoming Appeal Of The Pineapple
Sweet Delights Of Tropical Appeal : The Pineapple
Sweet Delights Of Tropical Appeal : The Pineapple
Nature's Delight:  The Pineapple
Nature’s Delight: The Pineapple

Consider the gift of the pineapple. Aside from its sweet delight, consider the striking ornamental design of this emblem of “welcome”. Whether it is the culinary delight of the sweet pineapple that beckons you or the motif and symbol of hospitality that decorates and adorns your interior or exterior world, consider with appreciation the tropical fruit as a gift of nature and the layer of hospitality that it presents. A symbol of hospitality and a “Welcome” appeal, indeed…

Kristin


“The great abundance of Piñas, the princess of fruits, that grow under the sun”
-Sir Walter Ralegh
Traveleogue Discoveries of the Large, Rich and Bewtiful Empyre Of Guiana”

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